What does the Charter mean for victims? 

The Charter of Victims Rights (the Charter) is about how government agencies should treat you if you are a victim of crime. The Charter is found in the Victims Rights and Support Act 2013.    

Under the Charter a victim is a person who suffers harm as a direct result of a criminal offence. There is more information on the meaning of a victim of crime in the Victims Rights and Support Act 2013.

What does the Charter do?

A victim of crime may come into contact with different government agencies and non-government agencies and contractors funded by the state for many reasons. The Charter makes sure that a victim is treated with courtesy and compassion at all times and their rights and dignity are respected.

Victims Services makes sure that government agencies follow the Charter. Victims Services works with government agencies to make sure they have appropriate guidelines and protocols in place to support victims and meet their obligations under the Charter.

Who is a victim of crime in the Charter?

Section 5 of the Victims Rights and Support Act 2013:

(1) For the purposes of this Act, a victim of crime is a person who suffers harm as a direct result of an act committed, or apparently committed, by another person in the course of a criminal offence.

(2) A person suffers harm if, as a result of such an act: 

     (a) the person suffers actual physical bodily harm or psychological or psychiatric harm, or

     (b) the person's property is deliberately taken, destroyed or damaged

(3) If the person dies as a result of the act concerned, a member of the person's immediate family is also a victim of crime for the purposes of this Act.

(4) If a person dies as a result of the act concerned and there is more than one member of the person's immediate family, members of the immediate family may nominate a representative for the purposes of the Charter of Victims Rights.